Annie Oakley Scrapbook (Part 2 -- English)

ReadAboutContentsVersionsHelp
9783 thumb

Page 1

THE NEW YORK CLIPPER

THE FRANK QUEEN PUBLISHING CO. (Limited.) PUBLISHERS.

BENJAMIN GARNO, MANAGING EDITOR.

SATURDAY, MARCH 5, 1887.

JUST before closing her engagement with the Wild West Show in this city, Annie Oakley accomplished the notable feat of picking her hat from the ground while she was riding at full speed. She and many others believe that this was never before done from a side-saddle by anything in the semblance of woman.

AT the matinee at Madison-square Garden on Wash-ington's Birthday Miss Annie Oakley was presented with a gold medal from the Ladies' Riding Club, making the fourth medal that has come her way since she opened in New York. She left for her home in Ohio 24.

Last edit 4 months ago by CYT Students
9784 thumb

Page 2

The Daily News.

1887 LONDON. FRIDAY. MAY 6

ROYAL VISIT TO THE AMERICAN EXHIBITION.

The Prince and Princess of Wales, accom-panied by their daughters, the Princess Louise (Marchioness of Lorne), the Duke of Cambridge, the Duke of Teck, the Crown Prince of Den-mark, and the Marquis of Lorne, visited the American Exhibition yesterday afternoon. Having been conducted through the main building, which is now nearly completed, the Royal party took up their position on the grand stand to witness a special performance of the Wild West Show, the cowboy band playing "God save the Queen" as they arrived. At the conclusion the principal performers were pre-sented to the Prince and Princess. Miss Annie Oakley, the champion shot, put out her hand to shake hands with the Princess, on the Republican principle of ladies first. The Princess smilingly pointed to the Prince, and their Royal Highnesses in turn shook hands warmly with the lady, and complimented her on her skill with the rifle. The Indians seemed greatly to appreciate the Royal visit, and Red shirt, to whom the Prince was introduced as the coming Chief of the Pale Face Nation, said, through Broncho Bill, it made his heart glad that one so high above other men should visit him; though his skin was red, and the Pale Faced chief's was white, their hearts were one. "How long are you going to stay in this country?" asked his Royal Highness. "So long as the White Father (Colonel Cody) stays, I and my braves will stay," replied the Chief. The Prince handed Red Shirt a number of cigarettes, which the latter shared with his companions. The Sioux Chief repeatedly laid his hand on his heart in order to show his regard for the Prince of Wales. The Princess took great interest in the papooses, staying several minutes to chat with a little fellow of two or three years, who was wrapped in a yellow blanket; and had his body painted in most gorgeous colours. The notice taken of the children highly delighted the squaws. Despite the muddy state of the roads, the Royal party visited and inspected the stables and the corralis where the buffalo and other animals are confined. Before leaving the Exhibition the Prince warmly complimented Colonel Cody and the directors of the Exhibition, and expressed the wish that their venture would prove a grand success.

Last edit 4 months ago by CYT Students
9785 thumb

Page 3

THE PEOPLE. SUNDAY

MAY 22 1887.

GENERAL CHATTER.

The Buffalo Bill furore is becoming ridiculous. Colonel Cody is, no doubt, an eminent man in his way, and for bossing a show even the great Barnum in his best days could not surpass him. But are these credentials sufficient to justify an outburst of fashionable fetish worship? London society should remember the shame which subsequently fell upon it for its adoration of the black mis-creant, Cetewayo. On the whole, I cannot but consider it a mistake for Lord Charles Beresford to have given the Yankee showman a mount on the box-seat of his drag at the Coaching Club meet. Noblesse oblige; there is a want of congruity in the companionship of an illustrious British officer who fills an important position in the Government with a gentleman chiefly famed as an adroit scalper of Red Indians. I do not blame Buffalo Bill; my censure is confined to the fashionable throng who pay their devotions at such a shrine.

Last edit 4 months ago by CYT Students
9786 thumb

Page 4

QUEEN, THE LADY'S NEWSPAPER. June 11, 1887.

Four from.............-Lilian Smith, the Californian huntress; Annie Oakley .......... pion wing shot ; Dell Ferrel and Georgie Duffy, the ......... riders from Colorado and Wyoming mistresses in .......... Miss Annie Oakley shows that she would be a .........ent in a match at clay pigeons, as she smas....................ther with great precision, and trap, and of..........own her gun and picking it up when the .......saucer was liberated; while one of Miss Lilian Smith's ..... feats is the hitting of a ball made to revolve at the end of a string like the sham birds at fairs.

Last edit 4 months ago by CYT Students
9787 thumb

Page 5

May 17, 1887. THE BAT

DIANA'S DIARY.

MONDAY. - Went Buffalo Billing at the American Exhibition. One could hardly mistake the nationality of the majority of the audience. The enor-mous headgear worn by the women would betray them as Yankees anywhere. One lady, doubtless hailing from the Far West, was costumed in grey alpaca trimmed with black passementerie, wore a big flog black straw hat, with a profusion of black ostrich plumes, and a most marvellously-arranged black tulle veil over her face. Americans have a marvelous knack of putting on a veil over these cumbersome hats, as French women have of wearing high-pointed bonnets, and fixing veils just to keep the wind from disarranging their fringes; Miss McGrigor looked neat in a light grey beige, em-broidered in cross-stitch of grey wool, and she wore a most becoming brown bead and tulle bonnet; Mrs. Jopling, youthful and light, in grey and white; and Mrs. Conover, in black, with a drab plush mantle. We couldn't get any seats, and it was such weary work standing, that we very soon left the "circus" and on our way to inspect the camp met with the American bar. Of course Bob and Harry rushed up to sample corpse-revivers and such-like. Don't know what they had but they became vastly more agreeable after-wards. Bee and I contented ourselves with a lemon squash. It was quite excellent, and a slice of orange which they put into it seemed to soften the acid of the lemon. Then on to the camp, where stopping for a moment before Miss Oakley's tent, we were most hospit-ably pressed to come in and sit down. She showed us the medals and trophies she had won, and also a darling little pistol of mother of pearl and silver; it only looked like a toy, but Miss Oakley implored me not to try and let it off at my dearest friend, if I didn't mind parting with him until the next world.

An overgrown circus sounds an awkward remark to make of the entertainment of our American cousins are providing us with, but despite the fact of its being Jubilee year, and that naturally we are loving every nation and everybody, and also despite Canon Farrar's prayer, Buffalo bill's exhibition is neither more nor less than a hippodrome on an enormous scale. All the best of it we have seen before, either at Covent Garden or at Olympia. To commence with Miss Lilian Smith. She shoots at glass balls, and as often as not misses them. Sometimes she hits them, and a roar of applause goes up from the Americans in the audience. But you can't expect English fold, even when primed with lunch and prayer, to sit solemnly gazing at a young woman smashing glass balls.

Last edit 4 months ago by CYT Students
Records 1 – 5 of 139