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The atmosphere changes once more and we are carried back to those days not so far distant. when no iron trail led from Ocean to Ocean; and when th mails were carried by the far-farmedf pony express rider. The endurance and dexturous skill displayed are marvelous. Throwing himself himself from one hourse with his mail pouch almost onto the back of another going at full speed, one realizes what arduous lives were lived before the days of the iron horse and the electric wire. Thence the transition is natural to the trail of the settler, to whom this daring rider carried the news of the outside world.

THE MAN ON HORSE OF 1797
FROM THE SEINE TO THE NEVA
FROM THE PYRAMIDS TO WATERLOO

ART PERPETUATING FAME
-ROSA BONHEUR
PAINTING BUFFALO BILL
PARIS 1689

THE MANON HORSE OF 1897
FROM THE YELLOWSTONE TO THE DANUBE
FROM VERSUVIUS TO BEN NEVIS

The great "prairie schooner," as the huge , covered emigrant wagons were called, appears upon the horizon. The boys and girls mounted accompany it, while mother and the baby repose within. They are jubilant and joyous, but alertk
for they are in the Indian country; suddenly, like a whirlwind, the red men charge upon them yelling like demons. Around and around the little caravan they circle, riding like mad and gradually closing in upon the lost, when out from the west comes Buffalo Bill, Leading his Scouts and Cowboys to the rescue. The tables are turned, and the deadly fire of the rifles and revolvers of the white men is too hotto withstand, and before long they are

in turn pursued and the rescue is complete. How many bleaching bones on the prairie tell the fate of those from whom the great scout was too far distant to bring life, hope and safety?
once more this marvelous scen changes from West to East, and the plains of the wild West give place to the sdandy deserts of Arabia, while the Riffian horse, the great Nomads of the East, portray with vivid realism their native sports and pastimes, and bring still more forcibly to the mind the great truth that the horse has always been man's best friend and ally. Before the wonderful impression created by this wild horsemanship lades, the spectator is once more back

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