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10672

THAT "MUSIC HATH CHARMS TO SOOTHE THE SAVAGE BEAST."

was never so truly and strikingly illustrated as by these musicians, in whom the devine passion was implanted by nature and who learned their art by the camp-fires after nightfall on the great Plains of the Far West. Then enters to the surprise and delighted spectator, the most absolutely new and striking cavalcade that the world has ever seen, and which comprises
ALL THE ROUGH RIDERS OF THE WORLD,
led by that Peerless Prince of Horsemen, Buffalo Bill (Col. W. F. Cody). They come in squadrons with a dash and a fire that fairly raises the spectator from his seat as they swing into line like detached sections of a small whirlwind. Indians of many tribes, lightly accoutred, painted with brilliant pigments, glorious and gaudy with bright feathers, sitting close down to the bare backs of their sturdy ponies, whooping and yelling like madmen, they furnish a picture never to be forgotten. Close upon their heels come the stalwart Cowboys with ringing shouts and swinging lassos, and then the Mexican Vaquero, that gorgeous product of the land of the Montezumas, silver laden from the heavy bullion on his expansive sombrero, to the massiv bits and monstrous jingling spurs with which he guides his horse as he sits in his cradle-like saddle. Then from a clime as cold as his hit, comes into view the Cossack, from the steppes of Russia, riding like a veritable Easterly wind that comes raiging down from his native land. Once more the tread of iron-shod hoofs and with burnoose as many-hued as the rainbow and mounted upon the famed progenitor of all the Equine race, the Bedouin appears upon his lovely Arab steed. Scouts and Guides follow rapidly, and then the pampas present their famous horsemen,
THE GAUCHOS OF THE VAST HERD-LANDS OF THE ARGENTINE,
way down below the Equatorial belt. And now the strains of inspiring music change to the appropriate national anthems as the carefully groomed and equipped horsemen of the famous armies of the civilized world appear upon the scene. The ponderous heavy cavalry of Old England, the splendidly effective cavalry of the German Vaterland, the brilliant and dashing Russian. Then the stirring strains of the "Yankee Doodle," and out dash the detachment of
UNCLE SAM'S CAVALRY BOYS ON WHITE CHARGERS SWEEPING FORWARD WIH THE SPEED OF THE WIND,
the blue uniforms of the men, the yellow braid and waiving plumes excitingly imediate recognition, as swiftly as a flock of giant birds they make their rapid flight along the plain, wheeling in magnificent alignment at the turn, circling like a rushing wave of color until rank rests behind rank in unison, to salute "Old Glory," as the Nation's banner comes proudly floating onward borned aloft by a sturdy standard bearer with strong arm extended, steadying the quivering staff as the fluttering flags splits the breeze-- and then! then comes the culminating outburst of pent-up enthusiasm, of patriotism aroused beyond boiling point, and the spontaneous demonstration of superlative delight as the vast audience joins in a tremendous chorus of approval and simultaneously rend the air with yells, shouts, cheers, huzzas, bravos and plaudits inconceivable.

SUCH A SCENE OF ACTIVITY AND INTEREST HAS NEVER BEFORE BEEN WITNESSED.
The Grant Salute, and as a word from the knightly figure in buckskin clad (Buffalo Bill), they wheel and vanish, a massive, comprehensive dioramic-panoramic exploitation of horse, man, flag, costume and kaleidoscopic color.
Now comes lightly running upon the arena of action a slender girlish figure, modest and grace typified in the frontier dress and the fawn-like movement. It is the peerless lady wing-shot, Miss Annie Oakley. A salute, and in another second, with flashing eyes, the rifle is at her shoulder, and the girl of the border-land pictures the dexterity which the maidens of the Far West attained with the rifle, which served a double purpose as a defender and a provider. It kept the wolf from the door both literally and figuratively. A race between races, literally, for the competition betwee a Cowboy, a Cossack, a Mexican, a Gaucho and an Indian, mounted respectively on Spanish, Mexican, Bronco, Russian, Indian and Arabian horses. And here there is no straining for effect; this is a contest in which national pride forces every one of the contenstants to do his best for his own ambition and the glory of his Race.

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